1 Dazshura

Powerpoint Assignment For Middle School

OBJECTIVE: Create a Multimedia animal report using PowerPoint and then Present it to the class. The subject will be an animal of your choice.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS: Each slide must contain a picture, text, background and transition.

American Hero Slide Show Requirements
Requirements Points

1. Title Slide.
2. Scientific Name of Animal.
3. Range and Habitat Map.
4. Diet.
5. Physical Description Size, Weight, Length Ect.
6. Breeding Info: Eggs, Live young, number of young ect.
7. Special Behaviors or Unique Anatomical features.
8. Weird Info.
9. Video, Sound file or Graph of Animal.
10. Conclusion

Grading: Points:
Points for meeting requirements
Points on formatting and creativity
Points for Class Presentation 100
50
50

IDEAS: IDEAS: IDEAS:
Great white shark
Flamingo
Kangaroo
Giant Squid
Mega mouth shark
Rhinoceros
Bald Eagle
Anaconda
Komodo Dragon
Persian Cat
Polar Bear Taimen Salmon
Piranha
Lynx
Wolf Eel
Nile Perch
Crocodile
Salamander
Tree Frog
Flying Squirrel
Ling Cod
Rainbow Trout
Russian Boar
Gorilla
Ostrich
Walking Sticks
Scorpion
Army Ants
Duck Billed Platypus
Amazon Leaf Fish
Hot-Headed Ice Borer
Hippopotamus
Manatee
Mudskipper
Alligator Gar
Sturgeon
Paddlefish
Amazon Catfish
Arapaima
Armadillo
Lemur
Tasmanian Devil
Dolphin
Rattlesnake
Panther
Mokele M'bembe
Chupacabra
Big Foot
Yeti
Wels Catfish
Mekong Catfish

Open PowerPoint.

2
Select Blank Presentation.
Click OK.

3
Select "Title Slide" from the AutoLayout.
Click OK.


4
Click Slide 1 Type Title Slide
Click Slide 2 Type Scientific Name
Click Slide 3 Type Range
Click Slide 4 Type Diet
Click Slide 5 Type Physical Description
Click Slide 6 Type Breeding Info
Click Slide 7 Type Special Behavior or Unique Anatomy
Click Slide 8 Type Weird Info
Click Slide 9 Type Video or Sound
Click Slide 10 Type Conclusion

Note: You have now created 10 slides. You can click on any slide to go to that slide.

5
Click on Slide 1
Click on the Text Box that is labeled "Title Slide."
Type in the name of the animal that you are doing your presentation on.
Change the Color, Font and Size of your animals name.
Drag the Text Box up to the top of the slide.

6
Click on the Text Box that says "Click to add subtitle."
Type your name in this box.
Change the Color, Font and Size of your animals name.
Drag the Text Box up to the bottom of the slide.

7

Right click on your slide and select Background.

Click on the downward arrow of the white box .
Select Fill Effects.
Choose Gradient for fading color backgrounds.
Choose Texture for a realistic looking backgrounds.
Choose Picture for backgrounds that you have saved from the Intenet.


8
The Fill Effects box allows you to add a background to your slide.

After picking your background click OK.
Now click Apply.

Note: If you click Apply to All all 10 slides will have the same background

9
Now you need to find a picture of your animal using the Internet.
Click on the Google link to search for a picture of your animal.

10 Click Insert picture From File.
Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the picture and drag it to the middle of your slide.

11
Click on Slide 2 "Scientific Name."
Customize the Font: Change Color, Size, Effects and Font Type.
Change the Background of the Slide.

Hint: You can give your text a Shadow effect by clicking this button found at the bottom of your screen.

12
Now you need to find the scientific name of your animal using the Internet.
Click on the Google link to search for a picture of your animal.

Hint: Search for scientific name anaconda to find the scientific name of your animal.

13
Type the scientific name of your animal.
Click Insert picture From File.
Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the picture and drag it to the middle of your slide.

14
Click on Slide 3 "Range"
Customize the Font: Change Color, Size, Effects and Font Type.
Change the Background of the Slide.

Hint: To find more cool backgrounds do an Internet search for PowerPoint Backgrounds.

15
Now you need to find the Range of your animal using the Internet. (The Range is the habitat where your animal lives.)
Also search for a picture of your animal or a map of it's habitat.
Click on the Google link to search for the habitat of your animal.

Hint: Try to find a picture of a map or a picture of your animal in it's natural habitat.

16
Type the Range of your animal.
Click Insert picture From File.
Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the picture and drag it to the middle of your slide.

Hint: You can resize your text box to fit around the picture by resizing the white handles that are around the picture.

17
Click on Slide 4 "Diet"
Customize the Font: Change Color, Size, Effects and Font Type.
Change the Background of the Slide.
18
Now you need to find the Diet of your animal using the Internet.
Also search for a picture of your animal eating.
Click on the Google link to search for the diet of your animal.
19
Type the Diet of your animal.
Click Insert picture From File.
Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the picture and drag it to the middle of your slide.
20
Click on Slide 5 "Physical Description."
Customize the Font: Change Color, Size, Effects and Font Type.
Change the Background of the Slide.
21
Now you need to find the Physical Description of your animal using the Internet.
You will need to find: size (length, height, weight ect.); lifespan; what it looks like.
Also search for a picture of your animal.
Click on the Google link to search for the Physical Description of your animal.
22
Type the Physical Description of your animal.
Click Insert picture From File.
Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the picture and drag it to the middle of your slide.

Click Here for directions for slides 6-10

Click on Slide 6 "Breeding Info."
Customize the Font: Change Color, Size, Effects and Font Type.
Change the Background of the Slide.

Hint: You can change the border color of your Text Boxes by clicking on this button on the drawing toolbar.

24
Now you need to find the Breeding Info of your animal using the Internet.
You will need to find: Number of babies, How they are born (eggs, live birth ect.), Do they build nests, ect.
Also search for a baby picture your animal.
Click on the Google link to search for the Breeding Info of your animal.
25
Type the Breeding Info for your animal.
Click Insert picture From File.
Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the picture and drag it to the middle of your slide.

Hint: You can change the color of your Text Boxes by clicking on this button on the drawing toolbar.

26
Click on Slide 7 "Special Behavior or Unique Anatomy."
Customize the Font: Change Color, Size, Effects and Font Type.
Change the Background of the Slide.
27
Now you need to find a Special Behavior or Unique Anatomy of your animal using the Internet.
You will need to find: A uniques behavior of your animal or a unique body part that most other animals don't have.
Also search for a picture your animal.
Click on the Google link to search for your animal.
28
Type the Special Behavior or Unique Anatomy for your animal.
Click Insert picture From File.
Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the picture and drag it to the middle of your slide.
29
Click on Slide 8 "Weird Info."
Customize the Font: Change Color, Size, Effects and Font Type.
Change the Background of the Slide.

Hint: You can use Word Art to make fancy fonts by clicking this button.

30
Now you need to find Weird Info about your animal using the Internet.
You will need to find: A weird story or legend about your animal.
Also search for a picture your animal.
Click on the Google link to search for your animal.
31
Type the Weird Info for your animal.
Click Insert picture From File.
Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the picture and drag it to the middle of your slide.
32
Click on Slide 9 "Video or Sound."
Customize the Font: Change Color, Size, Effects and Font Type.
Change the Background of the Slide.
33
Now you need to find Video or Sound about your animal using the Internet.
You will need to find: A video or a sound of your animal.
Also search for a picture your animal.
Click on the Google link to search for a video or sound of your animal.

To save a Video or Sound file:

1. Right Click on the link that opens the video or sound.
2. Click "Save Link Target As"
3. Save the file in your folder.


What types of sounds can I use?
PowerPoint 2000 and up can use WAV, MP3, MID, RMI, AIF, AIFC, AU, WMA, and AFS.

What types of movies can I use?
QuickTime files (*.mov, or *.qt)
Audio Video Interleave (*.avi)
Motion Picture Experts Group (*.mpg, *. mpeg, *.m1v, *.mp2, *.mpa, *.mpe)
Microsoft Streaming Format (*.asf, *.asx)

34
a
Insert the Video or Sound for your animal.
To Insert a Movie

* Click Insert Movies and Sounds Movies from File.

Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the Movie and drag it to the middle of your slide.



34
b
To Insert a Sound

* Click Insert Movies and Sounds Sounds from File.

A Speaker picture will appear.
Drag the speaker to the edge of your paper
If you use a sound you will also need a picture on your slide.
35
Click on Slide 10 "Conclusion."
Customize the Font: Change Color, Size, Effects and Font Type.
Change the Background of the Slide.
36
This slide should contain a picture.
The slide should also contain one of the following:

* The End
* A brief concluding statement like: "Thank you for watching my presentation I learned a lot about the anaconda."

Click Insert picture From File.
Browse to your folder and select the picture you saved.
Resize the Picture and drag it to the middle of your slide.
37
You can preview your slide show by click on the Slide Show button located at the bottom left corner of the PowerPoint screen.

Hint: You can use Right Click to move to the next slide, press Page down or press enter to go to the next slide in your presentation. At anytime click ESC to exit your slide show and return to your slide view.

38
You now need to add transitions to all of your slides.
A transition is: An effect that controls how the next slide comes into view.
Click on the Slide Sorter View this will display all your slides in thumbnail view.
Click on Slide 1.
Look right above slide one to the Transition selection box.
Select a Transition.
You can preview your Transition by clicking on this button located under your slide.
Add a transition to all your slides.

39
You now need to add Custom Animations to all your slides.
Right Click on the picture on Slide 1.
Select Custom Animation.
Check all the objects to animate.
Click on the Order & Timing tab.
Put the objects in the following order:

1. Title 1
2. Picture Frame
3. Text 2

Repeat step 39 for all ten of your slides.
40
Now you need to Customize the Effects for each slide.
Right Click on the picture on Slide 1.
Select Custom Animation.
Click on the Effects tab.
Select an entry animation and/or sound for all objects in slide 1.
Repeat step 40 for all ten of your slides.

Hint: You can add a sound to your objects effects.

Links
PowerPoint Tools

 

As you probably know, Google Drive is far more than a place to store files online. It also includes a suite of versatile creation tools, many of which perform the same functions as the ones we use in other spaces. These include Google Docs, a word processing program that behaves similarly to Microsoft Word, Google Slides, a presentation program similar to PowerPoint, and Google Forms, a survey-creation tool similar to Survey Monkey. Although Drive also includes other tools, these three are particularly useful for creating rigorous, academically robust projects. If your school uses Google Classroom or at least gives students access to Google Drive, your students are probably already using these tools to write papers or create slideshow presentations, but there are other projects they could be doing that you may not have thought of.

Below I have listed 16 great ideas for projects using Google Docs, Slides, and Forms. (If you and your students want to learn more about how to use these apps, check out my Google Drive Basics course; more info at the end of this post!)


Docs


Annotated Bibliography
By the time a student reaches the later years of high school, and certainly by the time she’s gotten to college, it’s likely that she’ll be required to write an annotated bibliography, a list of resources that not only includes the bibliographical information of each source, but also a short paragraph summarizing the resource and reflecting on its usefulness for a given project. Usually an annotated bibliography is required as a part of a larger research paper, but it could stand alone as an assignment that tasks students with seeking out and evaluating sources just for the practice of doing so. And the research tools in Google Docs allow students to locate, read, and cite their sources all in one place. To learn more, see this guide from Cornell University Library on How to Prepare an Annotated Bibliography.

Book Review
Instead of a book report, have students write a book review instead. This is certainly not a new idea, but publishing the work electronically allows students to enhance the final product with the book’s cover image, a link to the book’s page on Amazon, and even links to other titles the author has written or articles on related topics. For models and inspiration, elementary and middle school students can read student-written reviews on sites like Spaghetti Book Club. Older or advanced students might work toward more sophisticated, nuanced review styles like book reviews written on Oprah.com.

Book Review

 

Collaborative Story
Because Google Docs is cloud-based, multiple people can work on a Doc at the same time. So students can work together on a story, a script for a play, or any other kind of group writing project. They can use the comments feature to give each other feedback and make decisions together. And because students can work from any location with an Internet connection, collaboration isn’t restricted to school hours; each group member can work on the project from any location whenever they have time.

Media-Rich Research Paper
Any kind of research paper can be given a big boost when done in a Google Doc, because students can insert images, drawings, and links to other relevant resources, like articles and videos. Using the research tools built into Docs, students can research their topics and include in-text citations with footnotes.

Super Simple Blog
If you don’t want to mess with actual blogging platforms, but want students to be able to experience writing blog posts that contain images and hyperlinks to other websites, this could be accomplished easily in a single running Google Doc.

“Blog Posts” without the fuss, written in Google Docs.

 

Table
Being able to organize information visually is an important skill, and students who understand how to build a table in Google Docs will have a skill for presenting all kinds of information in the future. They can be used as a compare and contrast exercise, to display data from an experiment, or even put together a schedule. Yes, you could do these things yourself, print them, and have students fill them out, but why not have STUDENTS practice learn how to create the tables themselves? 

Instead of creating a job chart yourself, have students build it from scratch.

 


Slides


Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Story
Because slides can contain hyperlinks to other slides, students could build a whole story where the reader chooses different options at key points in the story, leading them down completely different paths. The reader would consume the content as a slideshow, clicking on the links themselves as they go through. This could be a pretty massive undertaking, but we all know students who would be totally up for the challenge.

E-book
These could take a variety of forms: mini-textbooks, children’s books, cookbooks or how-to manuals, personal art or writing portfolios, even yearbook-style memory books. To learn more about the possibilities, see my post from earlier this year on Student E-Books.

 

Magazine
Along the same lines as an e-book, students could use a similar template to create a PDF magazine or newsletter that is shared online on a regular schedule. The possibilities here are endless, useful for student clubs or sports teams, classroom or grade-level newsletters, or magazines put out by groups of students who share a common interest, like gaming systems, soccer, or books.

Museum Kiosk
Imagine if we could enhance science fair projects with a looping video display that provides the audience with vivid visuals and text about our topic. Or imagine an art show, where a self-running informational slideshow could be placed beside an art display to share the story behind the piece and photos of the work in progress? This is possible and EASY in Google Slides: Simply create a slideshow, then use the “Publish to the Web” feature to create a slideshow that auto-advances and has no need for a presenter. Pop that up on an iPad or laptop and you’re all set. This mock-up of a slideshow on Coral Reefs shows you what it could look like (click the image to open in a new window).

Click the image above to watch a sample Museum Kiosk in action.

 

Short Film
Students can upload their own images and add text boxes to a slideshow to create an animated story, then record the slideshow with a Google extension called Screencastify. They can either record their own voice as narration, add background music, or both. There are so many different kinds of films students could produce: illustrated stories or poems, final reflections for a 20 Time or Genius Hour project, video textbooks on content-related topics, or news-like feature stories of school or community events. In this quick sample, I added music from YouTube’s library of royalty-free music that anyone can use to enhance their recordings:

 

Video Tutorial
Using the same screencasting software mentioned above, students could also create their own video tutorials by creating a Slides presentation on their topic (such as “How to Open a Combination Lock”), then recording the slideshow with narration. This would make a nice final product for a unit on informational writing or a way for students to demonstrate their learning at the end of a unit in science (“How to Take Care of Lab Equipment”), social studies (“How to Measure Distance on a Map”), or math (“How to Multiply Fractions”). Student-made tutorials could even be created to teach classroom procedures. And any tutorials students make could be stored for later, so other students can also benefit from them. Learn more about how Screencastify works right inside Chrome.


Forms


Peer Survey
Whenever students need to gather data to support an argumentative essay or speech, let them gather data quickly and easily by creating a survey with Google Forms. Links to the survey can be sent out via email, QR codes, or through a post in a learning management system like Edmodo or Google Classroom. When results come in, students can use them to support whatever claim they are trying to make in their argument, or make adjustments based on what they discover in their research.

 

Feedback Form
Have students provide feedback to each other’s presentations, speeches, even videos using Google Forms. Here’s how it would work: Each student creates her own form, asking for the kind of feedback she wants on the project. As other students view or the project, they can be sent to a form to offer praise or constructive criticism, which the creator would then be able to view privately and use to improve the project. Students could even use their feedback to write a reflection on their process after the project is done.

Quiz
One great way to learn material is to create a test or quiz over the content. Have students use Google Forms to create their own multiple-choice, True/False, fill-in-the-blank, or open-ended quizzes on the content they are learning.

Visual Representation of Data Sets
Whenever people enter responses to a Form, Google allows the form creator to view responses in charts and graphs. Have students gain a better understanding of how data can be represented visually by accepting responses (or entering their own fake ones) into a Form, then looking at how the numbers are represented in graphs. This could work well as a series of math lessons.

Way Beyond Worksheets

Just this morning on Twitter, someone posted a comment along these lines: “A worksheet on a Google Doc is STILL a worksheet. Students should be using tech to create!” I’ve heard this sentiment over and over, and it’s exactly why I’ve put this list together. Google offers some incredibly powerful tools if we know how to use them. I hope this list has given you a few new ideas to put into your students hands! ♦

 


But how do you teach students to use the tools?

Google Drive Basics has you covered.

Google Drive Basics is a collection of 44 short videos that allow you and your students to learn Docs, Slides, and Forms at your own pace. Because YOU download the videos and store them on your own Google Drive, there’s no need to create new logins or worry about access to YouTube or any other site. Here’s a sample of just one of the videos:

 

And there’s more than just video: You also get a set of Quick Notes for each tool, so students don’t have to keep returning to the videos to remind themselves of how to perform tasks they’ve already learned, and a Skills Challenge for each tool to give students hands-on practice. Each Skills Challenge offers at least 3 tiers of difficulty, so you can differentiate for various ability levels, plus a link to a completed sample for each level, so students can see how a finished product should look.

Once you have these tools installed on your Drive, students will be able to create all kinds of projects like the ones listed above, but YOU won’t have to spend any time teaching them how to use the tools.

Check Out the Video Course Now!


There’s a lot more where this came from.
Join the Cult of Pedagogy mailing list and get weekly tips, tools, and inspiration—in quick, bite-sized packages—all geared toward making your teaching more effective and fun. You’ll get access to my members-only library of free downloadable resources, including my e-booklet, 20 Ways to Cut Your Grading Time in Half, which has helped thousands of teachers spend less time grading. If you are already a subscriber and want this resource, just check your most recent email for a link to the Members-Only Library—it’s in there!

 

Posted In:

Categories: Instruction, Technology

Tags: assessment, content area literacy, English language arts, Grades 3-5, Grades 6-8, Grades 9-12, project-based learning, teaching with tech, tech tools

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